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Posts for: November, 2017

By Dentistry at Camp Creek
November 21, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

A full 15 percent of Americans see their dentists for placement of full dentures each year, says the American College of Prosthodontistsdentures. That's a lot of tooth loss, but fortunately, these edentulous people realize the necessity of replacing their teeth lost to injury, gum disease, cancer treatment, decay and more. Nutrition and appearance benefit from well-fitting artificial teeth and so does self-confidence. Learn details on dentures from South Atlanta dentist, Dr. Travon Holt.

What happens when we lose teeth

Loss of some or all of your teeth impacts how you eat and how you talk. Many individuals with substantial tooth loss simply modify their diets so they can comfortably chew with just their gum tissue. You can imagine how many healthy and favorite foods they miss.

In addition, edentulous people experience dramatic changes to their personal appearance. Whenever teeth are extracted, jaw bone and gums recede almost immediately, reducing the height of dental bites, collapsing facial contours and creating premature skin wrinkling. In effect, young people look old, and older people look even older.

When facial appearance changes so dramatically, self-confidence inevitably suffers. As the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry states, "Your smile becomes you," and if that smile is deficient in some way, your persona retreats.

What dentures do

South Atlanta dentures from the skilled hands of Dr. Holt and his dedicated team fully replace oral function and facial appearance. Created from tooth- and gum-colored acrylic according to oral impressions and specifications from Dr. Holt, dentures fit precisely, helping patients eat, talk, laugh and smile with complete confidence.

Types of dentures

Dentures are customized to patient need. There are two basic types: partial dentures and full dentures. Partial dentures fit the mouth the way a puzzle piece fits into a jigsaw puzzle, effectively spanning smile gaps. The artificial teeth are mounted on a thin metal frame, and clasps anchor the prosthetic to adjoining natural teeth.

Full dentures, however, are typically held in place by the mouth's natural suction. Sometimes, a wearer will add denture adhesive to avoid slippage when necessary.

Full dentures come in two kinds:

  • Immediate, which are placed right after tooth extraction, but must be refitted after gums and bone heal and shrink
  • Conventional, which are placed after the gums and bone are fully healed

Conventional dentures do not need refitting as immediate dentures do. Also, conventional dentures may be supported with strategically placed dental implants, titanium screws inserted into the jaw bone. The denture snaps onto the implants, providing superior hold. Some implant-supported dentures are removable and some are permanent. Dr. Holt helps patients determine which kind of denture is best for their unique situations.

Feel good, look great

You can when you wear lifelike dentures from Dr. Travon Holt in South Atlanta. Why not contact his office today for a one-on-one consultation? Phone (404) 629-9290.


By Dentistry at Camp Creek
November 21, 2017
Category: Oral Health
LifeIsSometimesaGrindforBrookeShields

Ever since childhood, when her career as a model and actress took off, Brooke Shields has enjoyed worldwide recognition — through advertisements for designer jeans, appearances on The Muppet Show, and starring roles in big-screen films. But not long ago, that familiar face was spotted in an unusual place: wearing a nasal anesthesia mask at the dentist's office. In fact, Shields posted the photo to her own Instagram account, with the caption “More dental surgery! I grind my teeth!” And judging by the number of comments the post received, she's far from alone.

In fact, researchers estimate that around one in ten adults have dental issues that stem from teeth grinding, which is also called bruxism. (Many children also grind their teeth, but it rarely causes serious problems, and is often outgrown.) About half of the people who are teeth grinders report problems like persistent headaches, jaw tenderness and sore teeth. Bruxism may also result in excessive tooth wear, and may damage dental work like crowns and bridges; in severe cases, loosened or fractured teeth have been reported.

Researchers have been studying teeth grinding for many years; their findings seem to indicate that it has no single cause. However, there are a number of factors that play a significant role in this condition. One is the anatomy of the jaw itself, and the effect of worn or misaligned teeth on the bite. Another factor relates to changes in brain activity that occur during the sleep cycle. In fact, nocturnal (nighttime) bruxism is now classified as a sleep-related movement disorder. Still other factors, such as the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs, and a high level of stress or anxiety, can make an individual more likely to experience bruxism.

What can be done for people whose teeth grinding is causing problems? Since this condition may have many causes, a number of different treatments are available. Successful management of bruxism often begins by striving to eliminate the factors that may cause problems — for example, making lifestyle changes to improve your health, creating a soothing nighttime environment, and trying stress-reduction techniques; these may include anything from warm baths and soft music at bedtime, to meditation and mindfulness exercises.

Several dental treatments are also available, including a custom-made occlusal guard (night guard) that can keep your teeth from being damaged by grinding. In some cases, a bite adjustment may also be recommended: In this procedure, a small amount of enamel is removed from a tooth to change the way it contacts the opposite tooth, thereby lessening the biting force on it. More invasive techniques (such as surgery) are rarely needed.

A little tooth grinding once in a while can be a normal response to stress; in fact, becoming aware of the condition is often the first step to controlling it. But if you begin to notice issues that could stem from bruxism — or if the loud grinding sounds cause problems for your sleeping partner — it may be time to contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more about bruxism in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Stress and Tooth Habits.”


By Dentistry at Camp Creek
November 06, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
HereisHowYoucanImproveYourWeddingDaySmile

Congratulations—you’re engaged! It’s a stupendous (and hectic) time in your life as you plan your upcoming wedding.

You want to look your best for the big day—which means you may be dieting, exercising or making changes to your hairstyle and makeup. Be sure, though, to consider another important part of your appearance—your teeth and gums. Here are a few options that could help your wedding day smile shine even more.

Cleanings and whitening. While dental cleanings are primarily about removing disease-causing plaque and tartar they can also give your teeth that clean and polished look. And if you want an extra boost in brightness, consider whitening—we may be able to lighten up your teeth’s stain-induced dullness.

Bonding. If your teeth have slight imperfections—chipping, slight gaps or staining that doesn’t respond well to whitening, consider bonding techniques to repair or cover these defects. Composite resin is a dental material that can be shaped and bonded to teeth to reform a deformed tooth—and with color matching as well. For more extensive defects you can cover the front of imperfect teeth with bonded porcelain veneers or completely cap a tooth with a custom crown.

Tooth restorations. If you have missing teeth marring your smile, you have several options. The top choice: dental implants, which replaces the root of the tooth and will be able to have a crown attached to it. An implant can thus restore both better function and appearance. For more affordable options, you can also turn to fixed bridges or removable dentures. The latter can be custom designed to replace all the teeth on a jaw arch or just a few in different locations.

Gum enhancements. Teeth aren’t the only part of your smile that might need a helpful touch—your gums’ appearance might also be a problem. There are cosmetic procedures including plastic surgery and tissue grafting that can help correct overly prominent “gummy” smiles or, at the other end of the spectrum, longer appearing teeth because of gum recession.

Orthodontics. If you have extended time before the wedding date, we may be able to correct crooked teeth or a poor bite (malocclusion) that’s adversely impacting your smile. In some cases, you may be able to choose clear aligners, removable plastic trays that are hardly noticeable to others, over more visible braces to correct your bite.

If you would like more information on cosmetic dentistry for lifetime events, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


















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